The online book studies are offered to anyone who has a sincere interest to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the systemic issues that plague the U.S. around race, class and marginalized groups and who cares deeply about social justice. Each book study addresses current issues in society and allows opportunities for participants to reflect, discuss and hear multiple perspectives that can lead to greater understanding and empathy.

The book will chronicle one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.


Course Outcomes:

  1. Students will explore the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities.
  2. Students will lean about the experiences of Ida ma Gladney, George Starling, and Robert Foster.
  3. Students will explore the significance of the migration of black citizens and the impact that it has on our world today.
  4. Students will apply what they have learned to the greater context on equality and the marginalization of people of color.


This online book study is offered to anyone who has a sincere interest to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the systemic issues that plague the USA around race and who care deeply about social justice. The book study will last approximately 7 weeks (1 chapter a week), and allow opportunities for reflection and discussion after each chapter.

DESCRIPTION:

Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as “brave and bold,” this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status—even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness. In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a “call to action.”


Course Outcomes:

  1. Participants will examines the history of racial caste systems in America.
  2. Participants will explore the criminal justice system through a step-by-step analysis of the process of being arrested, charged, and incarcerated for a drug offenses.
  3. Participants will examine the racial discrimination embedded within the criminal justice system.
  4. Participants will review the many similarities between Jim Crow and mass incarceration.

The online book studies are offered to anyone who has a sincere interest to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the systemic issues that plague the USA around race, class and marginalized groups and who care deeply about social justice. Each book study addresses current issues in society and allow opportunities for participants to reflect, discuss and hear multiple perspectives that can lead to greater understanding and empathy.

In Hillbilly Elegy we explore a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working- class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.


Course Outcome:

  1. Students will explore current social issues that surround White working class Americans.
  2. Students will engage with others to discuss how their circumstances have impacted the current political landscape.
  3. Students will identify the current manifestations of America’s indifference to poverty.
  4. Students will apply what they have learned to create a call to action for change around an identified social issue.


Description:

As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as 'black rage', historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in the Washington Post showing that this was, instead, 'white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames,' she wrote, 'everyone had ignored the kindling.'

Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House.

Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage.

Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.