This online book study is offered to anyone who has a sincere interest to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the systemic issues that plague the USA around race and who care deeply about social justice. The book study will last approximately 7 weeks (1 chapter a week), and allow opportunities for reflection and discussion after each chapter.

DESCRIPTION:

Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as “brave and bold,” this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status—even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness. In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a “call to action.”

“No matter how good our intentions to be free of prejudice, we all have implicit biases that can have a serious impact on our work in schools.”  Participants will explore the concept of implicit bias and the nuanced behavior that is a product of our unconsciousness. As they engage with the materials, participant’s will have opportunities to reflect upon how your implicit biases may be impacting there work in schools as well as their personal lives. They will engage in activities to practice “interrupting” the behavior internally and interpersonally. Finally they will create an action plan around the essential question: What am I willing to do to not only become aware, but interrupt actions that reflect implicit bias.


Key Take Aways:

  1. Explore the concepts of implicit/explicit bias and the impact that is has on your relationships, society, and the community as a whole.
  2. Reflect on our individual biases and explore how it impacts the way we see others. 
  3.  Review the three major debiasing techniques; cognitive, motivational, and technological. 
  4. We will provide actionable steps in using the RIR protocol to recognize, interrupt, and repair relationships while addressing implicit/explicit biases. 


We talk about microaggressions and yet most of us feel woefully unprepared to address them when we encounter them.  Microaggressions are not always racial...but they always impact us.  We all experience microaggressions for many reasons, most them are related to our differences, specifically how we differ from what is considered the "norm." This presentation builds knowledge and skill to be able to identify and effectively address microaggessions when they occur.

Together we will explore the world of microaggressions, what they look like and how they impact each of us throughout our lives. This session will support participants to explore their own responses, bias and practice ways to confront microaggressions when they occur to begin to build capacity to challenge them in a compassionate manner.

Key Take away

  • Opportunity to examine bias' we each bring to the table
  • Practice having difficult conversations
  • Develop skills to be effective communicator


Unconscious bias and stereotyping affect all of our relationships. The impact between teachers and students, teachers and parents, and teachers and other educators shapes the educational landscape in profound ways. The need for teachers, who are at the center of these relationships, to recognize their unconscious bias is critical to the success of students of color and to closing the achievement gap. Teaching White provides a strategic roadmap for educators to uncover their own bias, define or redefine their racial and ethnic identity, investigate the ways that school rewards some students but not others, and begin to form a personal plan of action to interrupt the predictable disproportionality in outcomes for students of colors.


Key Take-Away

  • Explore the concepts of implicit bias and the impact that is has on your relationships, society, and the community as a whole.
  •  We will explore your teaching style and how it impacts the learning of your students. 
  • We will look at our privilege and the role it plays in our classrooms. 
  • We will identify areas that we can improve our engagement with our students to support their learning. 

Teaching begins with the establishment of relationships with students.”  Participants will analyze the systemic issues that perpetuate achievement disparities using the lens of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy. This training will examine leadership practices and instructional strategies that ensure the voices of ALL students are heard and reflected in the learning environment as an effort to eliminate the racial achievement disparities that exist in schools. Participants will engage in meaningful dialogue while being challenged to critically reflect on their own practice. Exemplars from the field will be used to demonstrate effective current practices that are making a difference for children who would be considered "At-risk” and participants will be asked to create a personal action plan and set it in motion.


Key Take Away:

  1. Explore the impact of Brown v. Board Of Education on our school system.
  2. Explore the correlation between classroom diversity and high academic achievement.
  3. Define the achievement gaps within our educational system and explore ways to remove those barriers. 
  4. Identify the importance of diversity and how it impacts a students ability to be successful in school.

Exclusionary language is embedded in the English language and undermines the ability of schools to educate students with diverse cultural backgrounds. By exclusionary language we mean language and messages that describe someone as not being something -“non-white”- and results in the excluded listener feeling “othered,” “less than,” or “inadequate”. In this training, participants will discuss the forms of exclusionary language and messages that are prevalent in educational settings, and discuss appropriate personal and professional responses to its use.


Key Take-Away

  • Explore how language can be used to marginalize people and groups.
  • Explore examples of Non-ness in your personal environment/communities and identify how it impacts the people around you. 
  • Explore the concept of White Privilege and the implications it has on relationships, individuals experiences, and the impact it has on marginalized people and groups. 
  •  Develop and actively practice the RIR protocol to address situations that affect marginalized groups. 

Topics to be examined include dynamics by which curricular and instructional practices are implemented in diverse settings; review contemporary and curricular issues; assess practical dimensions a leader needs in order to monitor/enhance performance of students and teachers in a multicultural environment.

Students will reflect on an “inside out” model to begin their journey to cultural proficiency, personally and professionally. Cultural groups who are traditionally disenfranchised and marginalized will studied and include:  race, ethnicity, language, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and mental and physical able-ness. Attention to enhancement of  instructional practice, learning environment, family engagement, achievement gap, and equity in all aspects of school operations, policies, and practices. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing data to inform practice, instruction, inclusion, and leadership grounded in 21st Century practice of collaboration, creativity, communication, critical thinking, curiosity, connections, and cultural proficiency. The four tools of cultural proficiency to be analyzed and include: barriers, guiding principles, continuum, and essential elements.

Students will reflect on personal belief systems in order to create a cultural proficiency autobiography, develop cultural proficiency school plans, and/or complete research to compare the practices of leading diversity experts. Each student will engage in classroom Equity Walks with specific characteristics to analyze.


This online book study is offered to anyone who has a sincere interest to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the systemic issues that plague the USA around race and who care deeply about social justice. The book study will last approximately 7 weeks (1 chapter a week), and allow opportunities for reflection and discussion after each chapter.

DESCRIPTION:

Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as “brave and bold,” this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status—even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness. In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a “call to action.”

As members of the Equity Academy, we share in the responsibility of creating and supporting an equitable and inclusive environment by exploring and implementing new practices that serve to support ALL students and staff. Through a series of engaging activities and discussions, you will deepen your knowledge and develop skills to address issues around equity and inclusion in your personal and professional lives.

 

Objectives:

  •  You will have the opportunity, as an adult learner, to develop your Cultural Self-Awareness and examine how it relates to your practice.
  • You will learn to integrate an Equity Lens framework that will help you to better understand, create, and implement equitable and inclusive practices at your school site.
  • You will learn and practice the tools of Compassionate Dialogue as a means to implement and sustain equity work.